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Meditative Prayer

Stain glass

Meditative Prayer  engages
thought, imagination, emotion and desire.

 

First you must find silence and stillness.

Ignatian prayer is imaginativereflective, and personalSt. Ignatius Loyola encouraged people to develop an intimate relationship with a God who loves them and desires the best for them. Ignatius Loyola trusted human desires. He believed that our deepest desire is to return God’s love. Ignatius Loyola also trusted feelings. He believed that feelings of joy and sorrow, peace and distress, were important indicators of the path toward fruitful decisions and deeper union with God. At the heart of Ignatian prayer are the Spiritual Exercises and the Daily Examen.

Imaginative prayer

 

Other methods of meditative prayer through:

  • The Rosary
  • Pray as you go – daily on line reflections
  • Praying with Scripture
    By Douglas J. Leonhardt, SJ
    Fr. Leonhardt explains Lectio Divina and Gospel Contemplation, two ways to pray with Scripture.
  • 3-Minute Retreat
    Focus on what is truly important through a daily prayer experience with Scripture, music, and images, offered by Loyola Press.
  • Sacred Space
    This very popular website produced by the Jesuits of Ireland and Loyola Press offers daily prayer, reflections, and readings.
  • Fine art
    PrayerWindows.com
    Bob Gilroy, SJ, shares how to pray with art in Ignatian spirituality. The site includes an online art retreat based on the Spiritual Exercises.
  • Icons
  • Stained glass
  • Creation and nature
  • Drawing and painting
  • Music
  • Dance
  • Symbols…

The What-How-Why of Prayer

What is Ignatian prayer? How can I pray? Why do we pray? These questions all speak to a desire to grow closer to God. Explore approaches to Ignatian prayer. (The well-known Examen has its own page.)

Why Do We Pray?
By William A. Barry, SJ
“We pray, then, at our deepest level, because we are drawn by the bonds of love. We pray because we love, and not just for utilitarian purposes.”

A Short Course on Prayer
By J.J. O’Leary, SJ
O’Leary explains that prayer begins with reality. Some of the comments and questions are directed specifically to students or teachers, but the full article is relevant to anyone seeking a prayer life that touches the inner core based on an awareness of self.

What Prayer Is
By Thomas H. Green, SJ
This chapter from Green’s Opening to God provides a basic description of prayer. Green discusses the effects of semi-Pelagianism on our traditional concepts of prayer and goes on to describe prayer as the opening of our hearts and minds to God.

Distractions in Prayer
By Kevin O’Brien, SJ
O’Brien encourages those who are experiencing distractions in prayer.

Experiences of Boredom or Dryness in Prayer
By Kevin O’Brien, SJ
O’Brien counsels careful discernment of feelings of boredom or dryness in prayer. Like all interior movements, they can tell us something.

Review Prayer by Keeping a Journal
By Kevin O’Brien, SJ
O’Brien offers some questions to ask after a period of prayer that might be helpful to consider while journaling.

Prayer: A Personal Response to God’s Presence
By Armand M. Nigro, SJ
A straightforward description of prayer as a loving response to God’s presence. Describes the 5 “P’s” of prayer and ends with a suggestion for group or family prayer.

Discernment

Ignatian Prayer: Ignatian spirituality is a way to pray, an approach to making decisions, and a practical guide to everyday life. Landmarks: Exploration of Ignatian Spirituality

Discerning Hearts: “Discerning Hearts is a trusted resource for Catholic spirituality and teaching. I support it as an apostolate for the new evangelisation that brings the Good News to every corner of the world through the internet.” Most Reverend George J. Lucas, Archbishop of Omaha.

 

To find out more about finding God’s will for your life by  viewing:

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